My skin tells a story

October 17, 2019

My skin tells a story

The other day, after I’d harvested a new crop of kale and stripped off my gloves, I looked down at the backs of my hands. Then I looked again, startled. I don’t spend a lot of time examining my hands. Mostly, they’re tools - those special tools we have as humans, that allow us to create. What I imagine I can make with my hands.

What I saw didn’t match what I expected. Somewhere, as they did their work, my hands had aged. There were new wrinkles, the soft ones that communicate lots of time spent outside. They were bony, and thin. I was reminded, looking at my hands, of my grandmother’s.

My first reaction, I have to admit, was to wish they weren’t like that. I wanted this part of my body to look the way I anticipated, to stay young and unworn. I wanted to be - to feel - unweathered. I think we all do, sometimes, when time catches up to us in the mirror. We wish we could roll back the years written on our skin.

But then, I started to think about what those years mean. They’re not just time. They’re relationships and work and experience. My hands tell a story of the years passing: decades rich with memories. My grandmother’s hands did too. They were how she raised her children, how she showed her grandchildren the meaning of work done mindfully and well. What we touch with our hands becomes our story. What’s yours?

Page
- Farmer and Cultivator






Also in Farm News

Happy New Year
Happy New Year

January 02, 2020

Every New Year, we’re surrounded by calls to make ourselves different in some way. Exercise more, journal every day, detach from social media.

View full article →

Saying farewell to 2019
Saying farewell to 2019

December 26, 2019

This is our last email of the year. Our last of the decade - though since Snuck isn’t a decade old, that feels a little strange to say. (Who can say what we’ll look like when 2030 rolls around!) A lot has happened this year, most of it good.

View full article →

Not your typical farm
Not your typical farm

December 19, 2019

When people hear that I’m a farmer, they have a certain set of expectations. We all know what the prototypical farm looks like: long, straight rows of crops, maybe a few animals, a red barn, a silo. We have a picture in our minds of what we’ll see.

View full article →

Be the first to know what happens on the farm. Sign-up for our newsletter below.

Snuck Share, Workshops, Events, Camp