Digging in the dirt

April 04, 2019

Digging in the dirt

The third bay of our greenhouse is a space we jokingly (although accurately) call the “dirt house.” While most of what we grow is hydroponic greens, we use this space full of raised beds and soil to extend the growing season for our Farmyard Shares and sow the seeds for our Plant Sale. Sheltered from Utah’s cold winters and nurtured in rich soil, the plants in this greenhouse thrive.

There’s something that took me a while to figure out, when I started farming seriously. Even as I was doing the things I’d always done, growing the things I’d always grown, I felt like I was missing something. Eventually, I realized I missed just growing my own garden: tucking some seeds and seedlings into the earth and enjoying them as they grew. I grew them just for myself, for the simple pleasure of knowing that I was tending something special.

I love growing on a bigger scale, and learning new techniques to make sure our farmyard and greenhouse are as productive as possible. At the same time, though, I’m learning to carve out that old feeling, of growing plants because it’s thrilling to be responsible for something alive. Every time a pair of leaves pops out of the dirt, it’s a new victory, a new sense of purpose, and a new reminder that no matter how long this winter feels, it’s always followed by spring.

-Page
Farmer and cultivator




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